September 2019: “Chasing Peace” by Alaine Greyson

Summary (Warning: mild spoilers):
Twin sisters are faced with different internal responses to the abuse they received growing up. We meet the coping mechanisms and masks of Samantha and Elizabeth Barrett under the manipulative iron fist of their mother, Portia. Elizabeth becomes engaged to a manipulative sociopath through an arrangement made by Portia, then disappears after the night of her engagement party. Samantha, while battling with a combination of her own addictions, failed coping mechanisms, and history of abuse, investigates the murder of her sister and the possible framing of a not-so-innocent drug dealer. Through this book, Samantha finds not only her real support network and severs toxic relationships, but also learns the importance of boundaries in friendship, family, and love. As an additional bonus, who doesn’t love a happy ending when it comes to character development?

My Overall Response:
Very few books can approach the tough topic of addiction without making me cringe as I try to force my way through. Alaine Greyson succeeds in not making me cringe. She is honest when it comes to the realities: coping mechanisms, cravings, cycles of abuse, support networks, and the steps it takes to get sober. First and foremost, I want to commend Greyson for her incredible representation of a character battling addiction and mental health issues without communicating judgment other than the experiences of the characters within the book. Additionally, I want to give high praise for her understanding of the healing process. These are not easy things to write about and deserve recognition.

This book tells an incredible story about recovering from grief, heart ache, abuse and addiction. It depicts multidimensional characters that show the capability of change and self redemption while also weaving together a mesh of genuinely good people that have made poor decisions. One of the best parts of the book are the moments of self reflection that keep the reader frustrated, yet also cheering for the characters as they grow.

LGBTQA Friendly?
This book includes major characters that identify as LGBTQA and touches on struggles in coming out.

Grammar:
The book has an easy to read style that makes it great for ages 15+. While there were some grammatical errors, for a small publication team these are not in any way extraordinary. After much consideration, the two editing issues that I found interrupted my experience of the book were:

  • The difference between a psychiatrist vs. a psychologist
    • A psychiatrist is a Medical Doctor that has been trained in the treatment of psychiatric illness through the use of medications and medical intervention therapies. While sometimes these individuals receive additional training to offer counseling to their patients, they are rarely a primary therapist.
    • A psychologist is a Psych. D. or has a Masters in Counseling. These individuals receive training the treatment of mental illness through therapies and are unable to prescribe medications in most states. In some states, they can prescribe non-Controlled Substances only, such as SSRIs. In Maryland (the setting of the novel) only a psychiatrist can prescribe medication, whereas a psychologist can offer therapies and supervise individuals during their 2 year training to receive their licensure.
  • The incorrect preposition on page 252: into vs. on to
    • “He splayed his fingers up her thighs and slipped them into her clitoris, massaging it with his thumb”
      As a reader, this word choice made me do a double-take because it takes an otherwise beautiful scene that I would describe as sexually enlightening for the characters involved, and makes me worry about anatomy. Contextually, I believe it is clearly an accident.

Twilight Zone Moment:
Every book has at least one. These are the moments that don’t quite add up and throw a reader rolling down into the uncanny valley for a moment in an otherwise brilliant scene.

  • Who lit the candles and poured the champagne?
    There is a moment toward the end of the novel where an event is being held at a location some distance from where the candles and champagne are. In my head, as a reader, I estimated approximately 6 hours of time elapsing prior to arriving at the apartment where poured champagne is still cold and a room full of lit candles hasn’t burned through the wicks and lit the apartment on fire.
    I recognize that this will not bother all readers because ,”Maybe they asked a friend to set it up for them” or “Maybe ______ was in on it”. I believe this would be resolved by adding a small bit of explanation.

I don’t use rating scales (for now). I’m sure I’ll become more predictable at some point. For now, know that I recommend reading this book and look forward to reading the sequel, Wanting Peace coming out in February 2020.

One thought on “September 2019: “Chasing Peace” by Alaine Greyson

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