Tag Archives: Lo Potter

Living In Two Places

I started writing this while we were in the process of moving.

We’re driving back and forth between the new house and the old. It’s an 8 hour drive each way, though this last time was 13-15 hours. I lost track.

I always struggle with big transitions, and I’m never aware of how much until the transition is over. We’re experimenting with a slower transition to Seattle. While this is delaying the acquisition of a P.O. Box for us, it is providing me plenty of time to enjoy the scenery of the Pacific Northwest along I-90.

There are quite a few lesser known towns and cities along our route that have incredible tourism potential if you want to stay within range of a cell tower. They all have access to trails or other outdoor sports year round, while also offering options for the less outdoorsy-types.

For our next trip west with a load of belongings, we’ll be starting in Missoula, Montana. Missoula offers a unique culture and downtown, plus the benefit of a growing airport with Westphalia rentals. Unlike Bozeman, you can’t get direct flights to Missoula most of the year from anywhere except Denver and Seattle, with the occasional Salt Lake City or Minneapolis option available. Seasonally, this expands to include Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Phoenix, and a few other destinations that have changed based on demand throughout the years.

I-90 mostly follows old US Highway 10.

You can still visit parts of this route in cities like Wallace, Idaho, where I-90 bridges over the old road. Wallace is an adorable town that warrants more tourism, especially in their incredibly well preserved historic downtown. There are plenty of parks and green spaces. As Americans itch to travel post-vaccination, but border closures limit us to cities within our own borders, I recommend checking out what Wallace offers.

I hope you’ll consider checking out these destinations 🙂 Just be sure to check avalanche conditions along route 90 in advance.

December Poetry Roundup

17 December 2020

Freedom is found
In knowledge sought
Connections imagined –
New dawning era of thought
Yet none speaks wisely
Who claim to know all
Pushing forth their opinions
As to not seem so small
Compensation calculation
For indiscretions of past
Look instead to the future
Nothing Can Last

11 December 2020

There’s a light in the forest
Beyond the break in the trees
Where water flows gently
Among the rustle of leaves.
Pardon the intrusion
Where humans should not be
I’ll return to the shadows–
Darkened path no one sees

9 December 2020

I hold space in the darkness
Where someday I pray
There will be light

8 December 2020

“Dans Macabre–” you say
With a permanent pearly grin
“It takes your breath away.”
As your long limbs sway
Stripped of their flesh
Now immortal as stone
With your clattering bones:
Restless soul with no home.


Thank you for taking the time to read my poetry today! These originally appeared on my Twitter account.

Pacific Northwest Ramblings

Cascadia

We climb into the cloud forest–
Sleepy trees draped in moss blankets
Slumbering to bird song lullabies
Dreaming of snow covered melodies
Melting into symphonies of spring


Thank you for taking the time to read this post! It first appeared on Twitter here.

CHW Publication: Arahura

A new poem on Coffee House Writers makes reference to someplace I’m missing dearly right now: Aotearoa (New Zealand).

The Arahura River is a living, breathing thing with a soul unto itself.

It is also subject to some heartbreaking history of the colonial Gold Rush era. The Ngāi Tahu or Kāi Tahu iwi made a treaty with the British Crown that allowed resource mining, while still retaining iwi ownership and rights to the Arahura. These rights were ignored.

I’m lucky enough to have seen the majesty of the Arahura. It is very recent that amends began to be made. Please take a moment to visit Arahura Dreaming to learn more about the Arahura Pa and what you can do to support the iwi that make the country of Aotearoa (New Zealand) so great. If you visit, please do so with the utmost respect and treat Arahura with the same innate rights as any other human being would have.